Women Faculty at Rush

Learn more about the mentors and mentees who participate in Rush University’s Women Mentoring Program and why they believe mentorship is so important to professional — and personal — development.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Rosalinda Alvarado, MD    
Assistant Professor
Department of Surgery, Rush Medical College

“I think that mentoring is extremely important. I had a great mentor as a resident who was very supportive of my ambitions and helped me secure an amazing fellowship.”

Sawsan Awad, MD, MSc
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics, Rush Medical College

I like working at Rush because everyone truly cares about providing the best for patients.”              

Mariam Aziz, MD 
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine (Division of Infectious Diseases) and Pediatrics, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is key to really taking your career to the next level. As a mentor, there is nothing more fulfilling than seeing the ultimate realization of the potential of a trainee. Many of us are where we are in our careers because a sponsor advocated for us behind closed doors. We should never forego the chance to be a sponsor for someone who deserves it.”

B



Elizabeth Baker, MD, MHPE 
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I really enjoy developing relationships with junior colleagues.”

Gail Basch, MD 
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Without mentorship, one often feels untethered. That was certainly true in my case early in my career and contributed to depression and impairment. Now, as a physician in recovery - my message is “Learn from your mistakes. Ask for help. Get a mentor. Don’t keep secrets.”

Linda Baum, PhD   
Professor
Department of Integrated Biomedical Sciences, Graduate College

“Have a mentor is critical. Have more than one for different things.”

Ellen Becker, PhD, RRT-NPS, RPFT, AE-C, FAARC
Professor
Department of Respiratory Care, College of Health Sciences

“Mentoring is important for everyone entering both the clinical and academic phases of his or her career. We need to teach our students and colleagues about mentoring so that they have the skills to seek mentors if a formal program is not available. Part of this education should include how sponsorship differs from mentoring.”

Magdalena Bednarczyk, MD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine and Family Medicine, Rush Medical College

I strongly believe in the importance of mentorship and sponsorship. This is essential in a person’s professional and personal development. These are relationships that take time to build and to develop. As a mentee, you also have a responsibility to your mentor and sponsor to be prepared with an agenda, to be accountable and respectful of your mentor’s time and to set realistic expectations. Most importantly, you need to be open to feedback from your mentors.”

Adriana Bermeo-Ovalle, MD      
Assoicate Professor 
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is key for professional growth and success. Mentors don’t need to be in your immediate vicinity”
 

Elizabeth Berry-Kravis MD, PhD  
Professor 
Department of Pediatrics, Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, and Biochemistry, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is an important way to work intensively with a mentee and to teach by example. It allows for the transfer of research and clinical expertise to the mentee though direct exposure and is very important for the preparation of students. It helps them with the development of independent projects and shows the mentee how to build projects and areas of specialty.”
 

Anila Bindal, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is absolutely vital. It is one of the greatest gifts to be able to see someone’s true potential and guide them in harnessing their best. Without the guidance from my mentors, I would not have had the courage to follow my passions.”

Torrey Birch, MD    
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Good mentorship is critical for growth and development.”

Marie Brown, MD     
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is of undeniably great importance.”

C



Ana Capuano, MPS, MS, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“What inspired me was the chance to have an impact on people’s lives through the prevention of disease and the promotion of healthy lifestyles.”

Cathy Catrambone, PhD, RN, FAAN 
Associate Professor
Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing, College of Nursing

“The mentoring at Rush is exceptional. Through the Rush University mentoring program and the mentoring in the College of Nursing I have and continue to grow as a researcher and leader.”

Elaine Chen, MD
Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is absolutely essential to growing as a professional.”

Cynthia Comella, MD  
Professor

Department of Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“I believe that mentoring is essential to a successful career. Mentorship is the fostering of a career and career steps. I also feel that having a sponsor (or champion) who provides new opportunities within and beyond Rush is important in order to grow in the field. I have had both mentors and sponsors who have enhanced my career.”

 

Stephanie Crowley McWilliam, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is a great way to learn from other people’s experiences, and the only way you can learn from others is by asking, observing, and keeping an open mind. We can never assume that we know it all. Sponsorship is critical to professional advancement, and sponsoring a mentee that doesn’t think or look like us can only enhance and diversify science and healthcare.”

D



Rupel Dedhia, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I have been fortunate enough to find and work with some outstanding mentors who have gone above and beyond to help me achieve my professional goals.”

Laura Deon, MD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rush Medical College

“It is a wonderful opportunity and can be beneficial to everyone involved when you are able to match with someone who has time in their schedule and has common career paths or ideals.”

Molly DePrenger, MS, RD, LDN
Instructor
Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences

“I lead a nationwide mentoring program for dietitians in weight management and bariatric surgery and notice that I often benefit as a mentor equally or more than the mentees I work with.”

Sheila M. Dowd, PhD

Associate Professor

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

Mentoring is a part of the foundation to building an academic career. I wouldn’t be where I am without the support and knowledge gained from my mentors.

 

Sheila Dugan, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Preventive Medicine at Rush Medical College

“Mentoring and sponsorship have been a constant, positive force that has guided my career and the various paths I have taken, such as my transition from being a PT to an MD.”

Suparna Dutta, MD, MPH   
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Both mentorship and sponsorship have been crucial for helping me get to where I am today, and I strive to provide the same opportunities for others. My previous division chief, Dr. Amir Jaffer, served as both my mentor and sponsor. He opened up opportunities for me in academic hospital medicine, including bringing me to Rush when he moved here from the University of Miami. I worked hard to be worthy of the trust he showed in me. I have found the most productive mentorship/sponsorship relationships are when both parties are invested and work hard to help each other. My experience as a mentor has been to serve as the following: Rush Medical College faculty advisor to the Class of 2018 (for their 3rd/4th years of medical school), faculty advisor to the Class of 2022 (1st year students), Division Chief for Hospital Medicine, which includes meeting with each faculty member (we have over 60) for biannual reviews and ensuring that each faculty member has adequate mentorship to help him/her achieve his/her goals.”

E



Jennifer Earvolino, MD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Unfortunately, I have not had the time to participate in these types of relationships.”

Charmane Eastman, PhD    
Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Working with research assistants, graduate students, postdocs and young faculty have been some of the best experiences of my life.”

F



Maribeth Flaws, PhD  
Associate Professor
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences

“We all benefit from having both formal and informal mentors. I have been watching and learning from my colleagues since I started my career, and whether they know it or not, my mentors have helped shape the type of professional I am today. I am honored to be able to mentor others directly through the mentoring program and indirectly through my actions.”

Jori Fleisher, MD MSCE   
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring and sponsorship cannot be overvalued; they are absolutely critical to success, particularly when you are an early-career investigator. At Rush, I have been fortunate to find multiple, terrific mentors and sponsors.”

Tanya Friese, DNP, RN, CNL  
Assistant Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have had many wonderful mentors throughout my career: when I was in the military, when I was a scientist at Abbott Laboratories, and now as a nurse and faculty member at Rush. Mentors assist us with gaining personal insight and strengthening mindfulness. They point out areas for personal growth while shoring up what we are currently doing well and providing opportunities for research collaboration.”

Janet Furman, MMS, PA-C
Assistant Professor
Department of Physician Assistant Studies, College of Health Sciences

Mentoring is an important part of career advancement. I was lucky to find a mentor through the natural progression of my career. It is important to set goals for yourself and then network with like-minded people. Being a mentor is also a valuable skill, and it’s important to contribute to your profession in that way if you are able to do so. Your experience is always valuable!”

 

G




Laurie Gillard, MS, MLS(ASCP) SBB  
Assistant Professor
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences
Program Director, Specialist in Blood Bank Technology Certificate 

“I think mentoring is very important. I view myself as a mentor for my graduate students. I get great satisfaction seeing them grow professionally. It’s an honor to be a part of their journey.”

Crystal Glover, PhD        
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“As many have assisted me, I must look back and assist others going forward.”

Sandra Gomez-Perez, PhD, RD, LDN
ssistant Professor
Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences

“I’ve valued mentoring all my life because many of my long-term mentors have definitely given direction to my career path and professional decisions. I think the best mentors are those who support you but are brutally honest when it is appropriate and necessary. At Rush, I have the opportunity to add new mentors to further encourage and challenge me. The opportunities for mentoring are limitless, particularly as part of the Rush Research Mentoring Program.”

Nina Goyal, MD, FAAO, FACS
Assistant Professor
Department of Ophthalmology, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is critical to any field. To be able to learn from others’ experiences is truly a gift.”

Patricia Graham, MD, FACP     
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“It is a great way to guide someone who might be struggling with their goals. Also, it provides encouragement to that person.”

Kajal Gupta, PhD  
Instructor
Department of Microbial Pathogens and Immunity, Rush Medical College

“Rush provides an excellent networking and mentoring environment in order to foster career growth and opportunities for junior faculties. Without Rush’s mentoring and sponsorship program, I would not, over the last couple of years, have gained the confidence that I needed to make the most of the opportunities that have come my way.”

H



Rebekah Hamilton, RN, PhD, CNL, FAAN 
Professor
Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, College of Nursing

“Mentoring is an opportunity for all parties to learn new things and share their successes and failures, both of which are necessary for individual and professional growth. I have had wonderful mentors in my career who have helped make my successes both possible and enjoyable.”

Abigail Hardin, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship and Sponsorship were topics that I really had not thought carefully about until I arrived at Rush. However, I have recently read literature on how men in many fields enjoy informal mentorship and sponsorship relationships, which help them establish clear career trajectories and make the most of opportunities. I want for all women, inside and outside of Rush to have the same experiences. It is important that women model for each other how to have healthy, supportive workplace relationships, so that we too can make the most of our opportunities.”

Jacqueline Hoffman, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC
Assistant Professor
Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, College of Nursing

“I had an excellent mentor throughout my graduate education and this relationship allowed me to flourish professionally.”

Anne Hoffmann, PhD, CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor

Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, College of Health Sciences

I was so fortunate when I came to Rush to step directly into a great mentoring situation. By working with an experienced researcher and clinician I’ve been able to take part in projects that then led to me starting my own studies.

 

Megan Hood, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring, in all its forms, is vital to personal and career growth. In the past few years, I have started my career and expanded my family, and solid mentorship from a variety of sources has helped make this a very smooth and rewarding process.”

Diane Howard, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Health Systems Management, College of Health Sciences

Bringing my former health care management experience with associations, hospitals, and insurance companies gives me a perspective about what students will face as they graduate from Rush and enter the workforce. The current generation of students have tremendous energy and want to focus on inequities in the system to advance quality and the patient experience. Mentoring and sponsorship are important because it encourages communication between the generations, which in turn advances patient care.”

 

Inna Husain, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Otolaryngology, Rush Medical College

“I think it’s important to use your experiences to help others navigate the sometimes challenging path between balancing clinical duties and the creation of a practice or career.”

J



Shivi Jain, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring can really help to shape one’s career.”

Sayona John, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Neurosurgery and Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring and sponsorship are great ways to introduce people to your field of practice and leadership.”

Angela Johnson, MSTOM, MPH, LAc, Dipl OM

Assistant Professor

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

 

I think mentoring can be a life changing experience, not only for the mentee, but for the mentor. For the mentee, it provides a priceless experience to learn & grow, to be challenged, and to feel supported - personally and professionally. For the mentor, I also believe it provides a rich experience for personal and professional growth, as well as, have the satisfaction in knowing they are making a significant difference in someone else’s life.

Mary Johnson, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, FAAN   
Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have enjoyed being a mentor. Mentoring has enabled me to get to know my mentee in a different capacity.”

Meenakshi Jolly, MD, MS
Professor
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship and sponsorship are both very important for one’s personal and career development. I have been able to reach out to other departments within Rush and outside of Rush to actively seek mentorship. I have also been actively mentoring trainees at various levels and junior faculty both within Rush and outside of it. We all need some amount of mentoring at various stages in our careers/lives, and we must also remember to mentor others when possible.”

K



Melissa Kalensky, DNP, FNP-BC, CNE
Assistant Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

I feel exceptionally lucky to have started my faculty career at Rush. I have learned so much just by being surrounded by so many educators with years of experience who are willing to teach and share.

Rasa Kalauskaite, MD, MS
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring allows you to see the hope inside yourself, to find your direction and to focus. Sponsorship enlightens your abilities and helps you make the most of your strengths in the broader world. We should sponsor and mentor, just as we need to be sponsored and mentored.

Kathryn Keim, PhD, RD, LDN
Professor
Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences

“A mentor is useful only when the mentee asks.”

Mary Katherine Krause, MS
Assistant Professor
Department of Health Systems Management, College of Health Sciences

“Especially because of the nurturing environment at Rush, faculty, students, and staff should feel comfortable asking specific individuals to serve as mentors or career coaches. It’s scary to reach out to an individual who appears “out of reach” and is possibly two to three levels above you. The worst response you could receive is a ‘no’ — but you rarely will. Typically, the individuals you’ve asked are humbled that you’ve asked them for advice and gratified by their ability to share their wisdom and expertise.”

Jane Kramer, MD       
Assistant Professor
Department of Pediatrics, Rush Medical College

Mentoring future generations of clinicians is the reason I chose to work at an academic medical center. Mentoring has been the single most satisfying aspect of my career.”

Amber Kujath, PhD, RN, ONC 
Assistant Professor
Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing, College of Nursing

“I feel that being mentored (and/or sponsored) is really about finding someone to help you network at to be your advocate.”

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Lisa LaGorio, PhD, MPH 
Assistant Professor
Department of Speech-Language Pathology, College of Health Sciences

“Mentoring is the key success. My clinical mentors have helped me develop into an advanced practice clinician. My academic mentors have shown me how to become a better teacher. And my scientific mentors have helped me develop a small idea into a novel line of research. Without such strong mentorship, I would not be where I am now in my career.

Melissa Lamar, PhD  
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“I have always been committed to mentoring and sponsorship regardless of my academic home. I enjoy working with individuals interested in STEM and making science their life’s work.”

Brittney Lange - Maia, PhD, MPH 
Instructor
Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I would not be where I am today if it hadn’t been for good mentors who helped me find my way.”

Sue Lawler, PhD, CPA, MBA 
Instructor
Leadership Academy Director, Rush University

“Sponsorship is essential especially for women.”

Nadine Lerret, PhD , MLS(ASCP)CM  
Assistant Professor
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, College of Health Sciences

“Rush provides an extensive networking and mentoring environment in order to foster career growth and opportunities. I am fortunate to say I love my job. Without mentoring and the confidence that I have gained through professional coaching and sponsorship, I would not be in this position doing what I love.”

Yixiang Liao, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical College

Having a mentor/sponsor is crucial to successful career.

Nell Lurain, PhD
Professor
Department of Microbial Pathogens and Immunity, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring can be extremely helpful for academic advancement. I had good mentoring in graduate school, but I have not had any significant mentoring at Rush.”

M



Amy Manion, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC 
Assistant Professor
Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have been very fortunate to have mentors throughout my career. Arlene Sperhac, Marilyn Wideman, Chandice Covington, and Lou Fogg, all of whom are Rush faculty, have mentored me and supported me in various ways over the years. I have tried to pay their guidance forward by mentoring others like they have done for me.”

Jill Marks, DNP, CPNP-AC
Instructor
Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, College of Nursing

“I would not be where I am today without my career mentors. They provide advice, help me create goals for myself and provide feedback along the way to encourage optimal growth. I have different mentors for different aspects of my life”

Mary Massa, MD  
Professor
Department of Dermatology, Rush Medical College

I certainly believe that mentoring and sponsorship are very valuable.

Patricia McCarthy, PhD
Professor
Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, College of Health Sciences

“It is so fun to be at the point in my career when I can mentor young women (and men). Supporting these bright, energetic young professionals is stimulating and rewarding.”

Maggie McNulty, MD  
Assistant Professor
Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush Medical College

“A good mentor can have a major impact on a prospective student’s life, and can ultimately guide him or her in choosing a career path. I am not certain that I would have chosen the career that I have if not for the influence of the great mentors within my field.”

Poonam Merai, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

” I believe mentorship is important.”

Joanne Miller, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing, College of Nursing

“Identifying a supportive mentor is key to professional development. Seeing your mentees develop and reach they career goals is very rewarding.”

Lynn D Mohr, PhD, APN, PCNS-BC, CPN
Assistant Professor
Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, College of Nursing

I think of a mentor as a wise and trusted counselor who can provide guidance and counseling in one’s field. I think of a sponsor as a person who is committed to supporting an individual as they further  their career. Such a person vouches for you by putting you forward for an opportunity..

Angela Moss, PhD, RN, APRN-BNC     
Assistant Professor
Department of Community, System and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“My favorite part of the women mentoring experience is connecting with women from other areas of the university and disciplines. It creates a sense of unity and belonging, both as women and as part of a large academic medical center.”

Brie Ann Muller, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Pediatrics, Rush Medical College

“Having a mentor whom you respect and trust can really make a difference when you are a junior faculty member who is just starting out at a new institution. It can be overwhelming when you are faced with the many decisions regarding patient care, research, leadership, education and citizenship.”

Ece Multu, MD, MBA, MS  
Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentors are there to ensure that the knowledge and wisdom they have accumulated over the years for themselves gets passed on to future generations through their mentees.”

N



Sukriti Nag, MD, PhD, FRCPC
Professor
Department of Pathology, Rush Medical College

“I have mentored medical students in the past.”

Celeste T. Napier, PhD
Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“I think it is very important to train young scientists. I am pleased that Rush is sponsoring this effort via the Mentoring Program.”

Disha Narang, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I would not be where I am today without the involvement of key mentors throughout my life. Through each phase of my life, they have inspired and encouraged me to achieve my goals. I was lucky enough to have mentors whose shoes I could see myself in later in life; this provided me with the encouragement I needed to achieve my goals.”

Patricia Nedved, RN, MSN, CENO, FABC
Assistant Professor
Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have benefited from being a mentor and being a mentee.”

O



Cristina O’Donoghue, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Department of Surgery, Rush Medical College

“None of us would be where we are today without our mentors, and if I am ever able to help a student, resident, or colleague expand his or her career, I will take the opportunity without hesitation. As a junior faculty member, I believe that this is one of the most critical points in one’s medical career to have a mentor.”

Chundo Oh, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush Medical College

“I believe that by serving the mentee, the mentor learns more.”

Tochi Okwuosa, DO, FACC
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“It is nice and easier if you have one significant mentor who is well-accomplished and interested in your progress as the mentee. Unfortunately, this is not always possible. Mentees must remember that it is fine (and enriches the mentee’s experience) if they have a specific goal in mind and have multiple mentors providing a myriad of input and advice, to help them achieve that goal. Their experiences with mentoring and sponsorship are, in this way, robust. I believe the motivated mentees in such cases accomplish more than what they had hoped for.”

Jennifer Orozco, MMS, PA-C, DFAAPA
Assistant Professor
Department of Physician Assistant Studies, College of Health Sciences

Mentorship and sponsorship are two different entities that are both important throughout your career. You need a mentor to help you navigate the clinical and professional waters, but a sponsor can help take you to the next level to leveraging their own partnerships and experiences.”

P



Aloka Patel, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics, Rush Medical College

“I have had a wonderful mentor and sponsor who has helped me take on new challenges and roles, to grow as a researcher and to become a mentor myself. She has been a role model for me, and she is the type of mentor that I hope to be.”
 

Janice Phillips, RN, PhD, CENP, FAAN
Associate Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“When I was here previously, I had a great experience with my mentor, John Mordach, who both inspired me and introduced me to some of the aspects of health care financing which have informed my policy work. Rush has unmatched opportunities to be mentored and to mentor others.” 
 

Yanina Purim-Shem-Tov, MD, MS, FACEP
Associate Professor
Department of Emergency Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Everyone should have one of more mentors to guide them; it is equally as important to have a sponsor, who can advance your career.”

R



Nancy Reau, MD
Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is the key to success. Without a compass to help direct your professional development, it is easy to find yourself making decisions that address your immediate needs but compromise your long term goals and ambitions. Mentors need not be gender-specific, and should always place their mentees’ interests above their own. I’ve been fortunate enough to have had several colleagues that have helped direct my career, and the most influential remain close friends of mine and have been directly responsible for my success.”

Carrie Richardson, MD, MHS     
Assistant Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is critical to career development”

Nicole Russo-Ponsaran, PhD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

“I believe it’s integral to a career in acdemic medicine. I learned so much from my early mentors at Rush and also from my mentees. I was able to form a bond with other faculty who were at the same stage as me, which provided me with a lot of support. I do not believe I would be successful in my career in acedmic research if I has not participated in the mentoring program here at Rush.

S



Anne Sammarco, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship was one of the main things I was looking for in a job. It is critical for career development.”

Rupa Sanghani, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring and sponsorship has been critical to my career. I was lucky enough to have a fantastic mentor coming out of a fellowship who nominated me for committees and writing assignments that really helped to propel my career.”

Annabelle Santos Volgman, MD, FACC, FAHA 
Professor of Medicine
Medical Director of the Rush Heart Center for Women

Aleen Shah, MS, PA-C 
Assistant Professor
Department of Physician Assistant Studies, Rush Medical College

Mentoring and sponsorship are incredibly important in the cultivation and advancement of clinicians, researchers, and faculty.”
 

Barbara Shaw, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC 
Assistant Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have mentored many students and new nurse practitioners. It is essential for the growth of the profession to support those who are just entering it.

 

Madhu Singh, MD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rush Medical College

“It is our common responsibility to help one another rise up.”

Nicole Siparsky, MD, FACS 
Assistant Professor
Department of General Surgery, Rush Medical College

“Mentorship is a vital part of the development of any professional.”

Carrie Smith, MD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rush Medical College

“I am always looking for mentors to help me navigate administrative roles in a large academic center. And, I am always willing to mentor others who follow me.”

Kerstin Stenson, MD, FACS
Professor
Department of Otolaryngology, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is very important”

Natalie Stevens, PhD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

The most important thing in life is relationships. This is no less true in one’s professional life. A strong mentoring team is essential to professional development, growth, and success. My mentors offer guidance and training while also “stepping back” and allowing me to trust my decisions and instincts. They also have given me more support than I could possibly have asked for as I expanded my own family, helping me to find that elusive work-life balance.

Tina Sundaram, MD, MS
Instructor
Department of Emergency Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I would love to have a mentor. I’m happy to provide whatever mentoring that students and residents require, but, at this point in my career, I think that having a mentor would be more beneficial to me.”

Sandra Swantek, MD 
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

Mentoring and sponsorship are the keys to professional growth and success. It is important to be open to nontraditional mentorship opportunities.

Susan Swider, PhD, RN 
Professor
Department of Community, Systems and Mental Health Nursing, College of Nursing

“I have been fortunate to have mentors who guided me in nursing scholarship, public health and policy. In turn, I reach out to students and colleagues because I want to support and guide them in their work, with the overall goal of improving scholarship and practice to enhance the health of the public.”

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Teresa Tam, MD 
Instructor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rush Medical College

“I believe mentoring is a very important way of “paying it forward” to future obstetricians and gynecologists.”

Anjali Tannan, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Ophthalmology, Rush Medical College

I have never realized how much mentoring goes on just as you walk down the hall talking to my colleagues and senior faculty members. Their insight is invaluable.

Christy Tangney, PhD, FACN, CNS
Professor
Department of Clinical Nutrition, College of Health Sciences
Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush Medical College

Mentoring students and fellow faculty is so fulfilling. It gives me so much joy to see students and faculty I have mentored grow and add so much to our understanding of nutrition science and practice.”

Shannon Theis, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Speech Language Pathology, College of Health Sciences

“I feel very fortunate to have the support of my department to participate in the mentoring program at Rush. Mentorship is something to be valued at all levels of career development and the relationships that one cultivates can last a lifetime, leading to both professional and personal growth.”

Erin-Emery Tiburcio   
Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College
 

“Mentoring can open doors to understanding and opportunites that trainees and junior faculty would never have considered. My mentors have offered me insight and roles I never would have known were possible, and in doing so, they have catapulted my career forward. I would not be where I am today without my mentors.” 

 

Mary Tobin, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“I think it is essential. I am from an era where we did not have hardly any mentoring or sponsorship, so I am thrilled that the younger faculty will have this type of support.”

Melissa Tracy, MD, FACC
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“We have all been mentored, although we may not realize it. Take a moment to think about those who have taken a special interest in what you do. You will come up with at least one name. Then send that person an email and update them on what you’ve accomplished. They will be so happy that you did. Next, choose someone to sponsor. You will feel so fulfilled if you reach out and assist a colleague, trainee, or student. Put these goals on your bucket list.”

Christine Tsai, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Mentoring is key to staying motivated and successful. Hearing from those who have been in your shoes before and can help you reach your goals is very valuable. Sponsorship is very helpful in experiencing new roles and finding areas of growth and leadership. I have received mentorship both officially and unofficially from many women in my division and outside of it. I have also been fortunate to have sponsors in both my division and department as well as at Rush Medical College who have given me opportunities that I had never dreamed. And I love them all!”

Sara Turley, MBA
Instructor
Department of Health Systems Management, College of Health Sciences

“Mentoring and sponsorship are really important to a successful career. A good mentor can help you more effectively navigate your professional environment and a sponsor will leverage their connections to aid in your success. Both are highly valuable!”

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Laura VanPuymbrouck, PhD, OTR/L  
Assistant Professor
Department of Occuptional Therapy, College of Health Sciences

“I believe mentoring is invaluable for the role it plays for all participants. My own experiences make me question what expereiences have taught me more. Acting in the role of a mentee or mentor. Clinically, the benefits results in more positive experiences for the clients we serve. Professionally, it creates an opportunity for life long learning.”

Jennifer Ventrelle, MS, RDN, CPT
Assistant Professor
Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush Medical College

“It is important to have mentors within and outside of your scope of practice. I have had mentors since the beginning of my training from whom I continue to learn and mentors who are experts outside my field who have inspired me to expand my scope of practice.”

Robin Voigt-Zuwala, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“Being mentored is critical, but mentoring does not have to be formal to be meaningful. Asking questions is a great way to learn from others.”

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Allison Wainer, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

The mentoring I have received at Rush has been invaluable as I transition to a junior faculty member. In particular, the experiences and support afforded by the Rush Research Mentoring Program have been critical in helping me to secure external funding and grow as a clinical scientist.

Susan Weber Buchholz, PhD, RN, FAANP
Professor
Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing, College of Nursing

“Mentoring another individual is a wonderful opportunity, and it is truly a privilege. To be invited into the circle of another professional is to be able to contribute to their success. It is an incredible opportunity.”

Karen Weinstein, MD
Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College

“We all have developed our professional profiles with mentorship. I am particularly inspired by mentoring medical students.”

Adrienne Wells, MD
Assistant Professor
Department of Anesthesiology, Rush Medical College

“I believe it is vital, especially for new, young women in our specialty. My residency director at Duke was a woman, and she played an integral part in my education through her mentorship.”

Dominika A. Winiarski, PhD 
Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Rush Medical College

Having a supportive mentor is critical to developing your research program. I have been fortunate to have strong supporters at every step of my training and professional development, and I hope to pay it forward to the next generation of clinical scientists.”