Section of Population Behavioral Health

About

The Section of Population Behavioral Health was established in 2016 to increase the capacity of Rush University Medical Center to provide mental and behavioral health care in primary care, medical and surgical inpatient units, and school-based clinics.

The faculty and staff of the section are drawn from psychiatry, medicine, social work, nursing and psychology.

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Section programs include a new collaborative care team focusing on depression. A developing program in substance use screening and intervention.

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Research

The Section has active training grants from the Substance Use Mental Health Services Administration and research grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. In addition several foundations support the work of faculty in this section.

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Partners

Faculty and staff partner with clinics across the Rush Health system and also have established collaborations with the Medical Home Network, The Night Ministry, several school-based health clinics and other community initatives.

 

Program in Opioid Treatment to be Launched
May 22nd, 2017
Rush University Medical Center has been awarded support by the Illinois Department of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (DASA) to help address Illinois’ opioid epidemic. Using support from the 21st Century CURES Act that was authorized by the U.S. Congress earlier this year, DASA is providing $380,000 to Rush to expand its treatment capacity for opioids, launch new training programs for physicians and nurses, and build systems with existing networks of care.
Dr. Hale Thompson Receives Grant in Collaboration with UCLA
February 22nd, 2017
Hale Thompson, PhD  has been promoted to Assistant Professor and has recently been awarded a grant in collaboration with faculty from the Nathanson Family Resilience Center at UCLA. The grant from the UCLA AIDS Institute will support implementation of recommendations from a Transgender Health Training Institute and Community Forum that Dr. Thompson co-hosted with UCLA faculty. The transgender training initiatives are supported by a grant from the Tawani Foundation to Rush.
New Faculty Members for the Section of Population Behavioral Health
January 4th, 2017
The Section of Population Behavioral Health is pleased to annouce new faculty members. Dr. Neha Gupta, MD, dually trained as an internist and psychiatrist, joined the section last fall to work as part of our collaborative care team. She has clinics in both psychiatry and medicine and works to help improve the care of psychiatric disorders within primary care clinics. In parallel, we are joined by James Mackenzie, DO. Mackenzie is leading the pediatric collaborative care team and will be working to improve the care of young patients across Rush’s primary care practices. He comes to Rush after a decade at Lurie Children’s Hospital where he directed the consult liaison service. Finally, Hale Thompson, PhD,  joins the section to lead the assessment of the collaborative care team program and to conduct research in community-based health care. Thompson is an experienced public health researcher who trained at the University of Illinis Chicago. We welcome these new faculty members.
Launch of Collaborative Care Team - Depression
October 15th, 2016
The Section of Population Behavioral Health in collaboration with Rush Population Health and Rush Heath & Aging are jointly launch a new depression screening that will cover all practices under the Rush Health system. This program, modeled other successful programs around the country, make use of state-of-art screening tools, advanced builds in our electronic health records system, and a dedicated clinical team of social workers and psychiatrists to support primary care practices in the network as they move into this area of practice. Depression is increasingly recognized as a major public health concern that impacts not only emotional and psychological functioning but also physical health and quality of life. Our model makes use of  evidence-based self-management tools, brief cognitive behavioral therapy, and, if indicated, medications to provide patients with a opportunities to get care in manner that is appropriate to their symptoms.
 
New Community Psychiatry Fellowship Program

October 7th, 2016

The Section of Population Behavioral Health is proud to announce the availability of a one year fellowship program a unique one year non-ACGME fellowship in Community Psychiatry. The position is housed in the new Section of Population Behavioral Health. The fellow will be appointed as an Instructor in Psychiatry, and will have a combination of clinical and research effort. A range of exciting clinical and research opportunities exist and the fellowship will be tailored to the interests of the individual. Rush University Medical Center is expanding its community-based initiatives in tandem with the Medical Home Network (Rush’s Accountable Care Organization), working in local school-based health clinics, and has launched a new Anchor Initiative designed to support communities on the west side of Chicago. This fellowship is positioned to support clinical and research initiatives that align with these emerging programs. Established research programs exist to work with homeless populations, HIV at-risk youth, veterans, underserved communities, and local school clinics. The section has active research grants from the National Institutes of Health, Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration, and several private foundations. Finally, the fellowship allows for individuals to complete parallel fellowship training at the Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. Candidates should be board-eligible or certified in Psychiatry and possess a strong clinical background with a broad range of mental disorders. Licensed psychiatric nurse practitioners and physicians assistants are welcome to apply.